Fairfield University School of Engineering
Electrical Engineering Department

COURSE: EE379/ECE479 Communications Systems - Spring, 2017

Instructor: Jeffrey N. Denenberg

Office: Bannow 301C

Google Voice:  (203) 513-9427

Office Phone: x3330

Email:  jeffrey.denenberg@ieee.org

Web: http://doctord.webhop.net/, http://doctord.dyndhs.org/

INSTRUCTOR ASSISTANCE: Mon, Tues, Thurs & Fri. 2:00 - 3:00, in BNW 301C and by phone or email.

CLASS HOURS:         T & F 12:30 – 1:45 pm, in Bannow TBD

COURSE DESCRIPTION:    

The course focuses on analog and digital communication systems and the effects of noise on those systems. It includes; Analog modulation and demodulation techniques (amplitude, frequency, and phase modulation); Digital Modulation and demodulation techniques (ASK, FSK, PSK, PCM, and delta modulation). It discusses performance analysis of analog and digital communication systems under noise with applications of probability theory to the analysis. It discusses information measure, source coding, error correcting codes and Spread spectrum systems.  MatLab is used to solve homework problems and do the Team Design Project.

PREREQUISITES

EE 301, “Linear Signals and Systems” (or equivalent).
The student should be able to solve problems and simulate systems using MatLab.

COURSE OBJECTIVES AND LEARNING OUTCOMES

No.

Outcome

Cognitive Level

ABET a-k

1

Students will know the constituents of analog and digital communications systems. 

Knowledge

c, i, j

2

Students will be able to analyze various methods of digital baseband and analog/digital bandpass transmission and detection methods.

Analysis

a, c, h, i, j, k

3

Students will know how to analyze and allocate performance objectives to components of a communications system.

Analysis,

a, c, e, i, j, k

4

Students will be able to design and simulate major communication subsystem

Synthesis

a, b, d, e, g, k

TEXT: “Modern Digital and Analog Communication Systems”, B.P. Lathi and Zhi Dong, Oxford University Press, Fourth Edition, 2009.

REF:    “Principles of Communication Systems”, Herbert Taub and Donald L. Shilling, McGraw-Hill,
            1986, ISBN 0-13-209172-0

            “Analog and Digital Communication Systems”, Hwei Hsu, Schaum’s Outline Series,
            2008, ISBN 0-07-140228-4

“Probability, Random Variables, and Random Processes”, Hwei Hsu, Schaum’s Outline Series,
            2014, ISBN 0-07-182298-4

            Digital Communications Videos, Dr. Ivica Kostanic, Florida Institute of Technology, 2013.

Lizhong Zheng, and Robert Gallager. 6.450 Principles of Digital Communications I, Fall 2006.
            (Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare),
Videos, Lecture Notes
SW:     The student should have access to MatLab (Full or Student Version, or Octave). 

GRADING

Exams 1 and 2

25% each

Homework/Class Participation

25%

Project

25%

Schedule

DATE

TOPIC

CHAPTER IN TEXT

HOMEWORK
(due the next class)

1/17
1/20

Course Introduction,

Signals Spectra &, Noise

Ch1, Noise,
Ch2a, Channel-Capacity.

Review Pre-Requisite materials, get ahead by reading the Text.

1/24
1/27

Review: Fourier, Linear Systems and Convolution

Ch2b, Fourier Series Tutorial, Fourier Transform Tutorial,
Linear Systems Tutorial

Design Project Introduction

HW2

2.1-2,6,8; 2.4-3, 2.6-2, 2.9-2

1/31
2/3

Transmission of Signals

Ch3a

Ch3b

HW3

3.1-4,5; 3.4-2

2/7
2/10

Amplitude Modulation

Demodulating AM

Ch4a
Ch4b

HW4

4.2-1,2,4; 4.2-7,8; 4.3-1,3

2/14
2/17

Frequency/Phase Modulation
Review for Exam 1

Ch5a

 

2/21
2/24

Exam 1 (Ch. 1-4)
Demodulating FM

 

Ch5b

HW5

5.1-2,3,4; 5.2-3,4; 5.3-1; 5.4-2

2/28

3/3

Exam 1 Reprise,
The Phase-Locked Loop

Pulse Amplitude Modulation

PLL

Sampling Tutorial

 

3/7
3/10

PAM Continued
Analog-Digital Conversion

Ch6a,

Ch6b

HW6

6.1-1,4; 6.2-2,4,11

3/14
3/17

Spring Break – No Classes

 

 

3/21
3/24

Digital Communication
Inter-Symbol Interference

Ch7a

Ch7b

HW7a

7.3-2,7,12; 7.7-3,4

3/28
4/1

Eye Diagrams
Bandpass Modulation

Ch7c
Ch7d

HW7b

7.8-1

4/4
4/7

Bandpass Demodulation
Review for Exam 2

CH7e

 

4/11
4/14

Exam 2 (Ch. 5-7)
Easter Break

 

4/18
4/21

Exam 2 Reprise

Project Seminar 1

 

4/25
5/2

Project Seminar 2

Project Seminar 3

 

5/5
8am

Project Seminar 4
Project Seminar 5

5/4-5/11 Final Exam Week

 

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Each student is expected to attend all of the scheduled classes if for some reason the student cannot make a class the Instructor should be contacted in advance, if possible, to arrange to turn in homework and to get the assignment for the following class. The course includes homework problems, two semester exams and a Seminar/Design Project (Project report, PPT, and simulation files uploaded to Blackboard). Students are expected to turn in all work on time; late work will be penalized.  Since all exams are “Open Book” but no computer or phone, you should have a hard copy of the text and not just rely on an eBook or pdf of the text as that would put you at a disadvantage.

 


 

Required Software:

1.   MatLab (Student Edition with the communications toolbox) or Octave for Windows
MatLab Tutorial by B. Aliane

Web Resources:

1.     The Blackboard system along with our course web site will be used to manage this course.

2.     Students must submit their assignments into Blackboard for archival and grading.  All work is to be typed (including equations), drawings are to be computer-base, not scanned, hand written work.  The best file format to use is MS Word (doc or docx), but PDF can also be used.

Performance Indicators and Grading: 

Two exams will be given covering several concepts each. 

Class participation/Homework

  25%

Design Project

  25%

Exams (2)

  50%

Total

100%

 

 

 

 

 

Exam Grading:

The purpose of the exams is to convey your understanding of the material; therefore, it is important that you show your work.  Even if you feel that the solution to a problem is obvious; you must still explain why it is obvious.  Furthermore; if you are asked to solve a problem using a given technique; then please use that technique; otherwise, I have no way to judge your understanding of the technique being tested. 

Homework policy:

Homework will be assigned from the book as your primary preparation for the exams.  We will review select homework problems in class and you will be asked to work them on the board for a participation grade.  We will also incorporate design problems / projects as appropriate to the material.  These problems are designed to challenge you to think beyond what the book has told you, and do real engineering.  There may be more than one correct answer. If you know in advance that you will be missing class please contact me to make arrangements so that you can keep up.

If you understand how to do the homework problems you will have an easier time with the Exams.

Distance Education Students:

The course lecture notes and supplementary videos are accessible via links in this syllabus.  You should submit scanned copied of assigned HW and your Exams via email.  Your project materials should be directly uploaded to Blackboard in the designated assignment area.  I will arrange for a weekly, web enabled Q&A discussion once the class begins. Distance Ed students should plan on attending the presentation sessions at the end of the semester of the design projects.


 

Academic Integrity:

Working with classmates to study, resolve problems, and learn the material is expected and encouraged during normal course work.  However, during individual evaluations (e.g. quizzes, exams, individual projects, etc.) you are expected to comply with all standards of academic honesty.  You will be graded fairly, and so your work should fairly represent your knowledge, abilities, and effort, not that of others.  Any breach of integrity (including but not limited to: copying solutions, internet solutions, copying from peers, claiming work or designs without proper citation, etc.), will not only impact your ability to learn the material and my ability to help you through proper feedback, it will result in academic penalty.  Any individual found in breach of this code will fail the afflicted assignment and will be asked to meet privately; any other offenses will be referred to the Dean for further action, and could result in penalties as severe as expulsion from the University.  

 

CLASS EXPECTATIONS:

TEACHER:

Distribute syllabus.

Review the material described in the syllabus.

Explain material.

Identify additional materials, Internet sites or books that clarify the material.

Relate material to "real world" situations when possible.

Answer questions.

Be available to discuss problems.
Be receptive to new ideas.

Announce business/class conflicts in advance.

Make up missed classes

Prepare/administer 2 exams and a number of quizzes.

Grade fairly.

Assign appropriate homework problems.

 

STUDENT:

Be familiar with the prerequisite material

Ask questions.

Stay current.

Study the material described in the syllabus, preferably before it is covered in class.

Complete the assigned homework (all chapter problems with answers).

Obtain class notes if a class is missed.

Use the library and the Internet to obtain supplemental material.

Prepare for quizzes/exams.

Ask for help (tutors are available for assistance)

Follow standards of academic integrity.